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Smallthoughts: Old School Tuesday …Earl Weaver

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I wasn’t an Oriole fan but I always would love to watch the Orioles in oarticular to see what Earl Weaver would do when there was a controversial play …he would well do what he do best… argue and demostrate his point. There is no denying despite the rants he was Baltimore’s winning manager in their history.As a minor league manager, he compiled a record of 841 wins and 697 defeats (.547) with three championships in 11½ seasons. He was promoted to the Orioles as their first-base coach in 1968, and spent a half-season in that role before becoming manager in July.

During his tenure as big-league manager, the Orioles won the American League pennant in 1969, 1970, 1971 and 1979. In 1969 the Orioles were defeated in the World Series in five games by the New York Mets team known as the Miracle Mets. In 1970 the Orioles won the World Series by defeating the Cincinnati Reds (The “Big Red Machine”) in five games. In 1971 the Orioles lost the World Series in seven games to the Pittsburgh Pirates. Pirates pitcher Steve Blass pitched a complete game and gave up four hits in the deciding seventh game, allowing the Orioles to score one run.

In 1979 the Orioles again lost the World Series in seven games to the Pittsburgh Pirates. Pitchers Jim Bibby, Don Robinson, Grant Jackson, and Kent Tekulve held the Orioles to four hits and one run in the deciding seventh game. In 1982, Weaver announced he would retire at the end of the season, one which saw the Orioles wallow at the back of the pack for the first half of the year before climbing in the standings to just three games behind going into a season-ending four-game series against the division-leading Brewers at Memorial Stadium. The Orioles beat them handily in the first three games to pull into a first-place tie. The final game of the series, and the season, on October 3, would decide the AL East title. Televised nationally on ABC, the Orioles suffered a crushing 10-2 loss. After the game, the crowd called for Weaver to come out. This tribute to the retiring Weaver provided intense emotion against the backdrop of the season-ending defeat, as Weaver, in tears, stood on the field and applauded back to the fans, and shared words and an embrace with Brewers manager Harvey Kuenn.

Owner Edward Bennett Williams coaxed Weaver out of retirement in 1985, but a losing season in 1986 prompted his permanent major league retirement. Weaver’s managerial record is 1,480–1,060 (.583), including 100+ win seasons in 1969 (109), 1970 (108), 1971 (101), 1979 (102), and 1980 (100). He only had one losing season in his managerial career, with the 1986 Orioles.

In 1989, Weaver managed the Gold Coast Suns in the new Senior Professional Baseball Association.[2] Less than a week into the season, Weaver was ejected from his first game. He later commented, “These umpires are high school rejects. The league went for the cheapest umpiring association. There should be no league if this continues.”[3] The Suns failed to make the playoffs in the 1989–90 season and folded after one season.

Smallthoughts:OLd School Tuesday salutes a Hall of fame Manager…Earl Weaver

MLB debut

July 7, 1968 for the Baltimore Orioles

Last MLB appearance

October 5, 1986 for the Baltimore Orioles

Career statistics

Games

2,540

Win–loss record

1,480–1,060

Winning% .583

Teams

As coach
Baltimore Orioles (1967)

As manager
Baltimore Orioles (1968–1982, 1985–1986)

Career highlights and awards

World Series champion (1970)
Baltimore Orioles #4 retired

Member of the National

Baseball Hall of Fame

Induction

1996

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