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Smallthoughts: Rave of the Week …Los Angeles Dodgers


 

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If you are on the National League schedule then chances are you been hit by a truck from Los Angeles …don’t feel too bad they have been hitting a lot of teams all season.  On Wednesday the Dodgers rallied to beat the Arizona Diamondbacks 3-2. The win gave the Dodgers 80 wins at this point in the season.

The Dodgers became the sixth team since 1913 to reach 80 wins in their first 113 games. Do the math  80 wins 113 ganes  which menas you only lost …33 games. At this pace they are looking at 114-116 wins possibly unless they ease off in September. The Dodgers are comfortably 15 and a half games up on the closest team the Colorado Rockies.

So if you are a fan of any other National League team and your team gets hit by a Truck from LA…It’s Dodgers and they are doing not to just your team but to every team in they play.

Smallthoughts: Trivia Thursday


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How did you do with this week’s question?

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If you answered…Joe Louis you are correct. Joe Louis reigned as Heavyweight Champion from 1937-1949  11years and 8 months and defended his title 25 times.

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Smallthoughts: Trivia Thursday


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Welcome back to this week’s Trivia Thursday. This week the question is on Boxing. Here is the question…

The answer will be posted on Friday along with Smallthoughts: Rave of the Week and Smallthoughts:Rant of the Week.

Smallthoughts: Old School Tuesday …Bob Pettit


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In 1954, the Milwaukee Hawks selected Pettit second in the first round of the NBA Draft after the Baltimore Bullets’ selection of Frank Selvy. With $100 in the bank, he signed a contract with Hawks owner Ben Kerner for $11,000 – an all-time high for an NBA rookie then. Pettit’s awkward ballhandling and a lack of strength to battle NBA bruisers weighing 200 pounds that early in his career, had Hawks coach Red Holzman move him from center, his position at LSU, to forward in his first training camp. “In college I played the standing pivot”, he said in a April 1957 issue of SPORT magazine interview. “My back was to the basket. In the pros, I’m always outside. Everything I do is facing the basket now. That was my chief difficulty in adjusting, the fact that I had never played forward before.” Though many were skeptical about Pettit making the transition from college to the rough-and-tumble NBA, in 1955 he won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award after averaging 20.4 points and 13.8 rebounds per game. He became the second rookie to win all-NBA honors but the team finished last in the Western Division. After the season, the Hawks moved to St. Louis.

He helped the Hawks improve during their first year in St. Louis by winning 33 games during 1955–56. In his second season, Pettit adjusted his game so that he would get to the free-throw line for easy points for his team and foul trouble for his opponents. Being a phenomenal offensive rebounder and an instinctive scorer, he told basketball historian Terry Pluto that “Offensive rebounds were worth eight to 12 points a night to me. Then I’d get another eight to 10 at the free-throw line. All I had to do was make a few jump shots and I was on my way to a good night.” Pettit won his first scoring title with a 25.7 average, and led the league in rebounding (1164 for a 16.2 average). He was also named MVP of the 1956 NBA All-Star Game after scoring 20 points with 24 rebounds and 7 assists; he would win subsequent MVP All-Star Game honors in 1958, 1959, and 1962. He also won his first of two NBA regular season MVP awards (the other was in 1959).In the 1960–61 season, Pettit averaged 27.9 points per game[5] and pulled down 20.3 rebounds

per game, making him one of only five players to ever break the 20 rpg barrier. He along with Wilt Chamberlain and Jerry Lucas are the only three people who averaged more than twenty points and twenty rebounds in an NBA season.

In the following season, he scored a career best 31.1 points per game, but the Hawks slipped to fourth place. After missing 30 games because of injuries, Pettit ended his career in 1965 still near the peak of his game. He was the first NBA player to eclipse the 20,000 points mark (20,880 for a 26.4 average). Of the 20,880 points he scored in the NBA, 6,182 of them (nearly 30 percent) came from free throws. His 12,849 rebounds were second most in league history at the time he retired, and his 16.2 rebounds per game career average remains third only to Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell.

Pettit was an NBA All-Star in each of his 11 seasons, was named to the All-NBA First Team ten times, and was named to the All-NBA Second Team once. Pettit still holds the top two NBA All-Star Game rebounding performances with 26 in 1958 and 27 in 1962, and has the second highest All-Star Game points per game average with 20.4 (behind only Oscar Robertson). Pettit averaged at least 20 points per game and at least 12 rebounds per game in each of his 11 NBA seasons.

He was the first recipient of the NBA’s Most Valuable Player Award. He also won the NBA All-Star Game MVP award four times, a feat matched only by Kobe Bryant.

In 1970, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Pettit was named to the NBA’s 35th Anniversary Team in 1980, and was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996.

Smallthoughts: Old School Tuesday spotlights…Bob Pettit.


Image result for bob pettitImage result for bob pettit

In 1954, the Milwaukee Hawks selected Pettit second in the first round of the NBA Draft after the Baltimore Bullets’ selection of Frank Selvy. With $100 in the bank, he signed a contract with Hawks owner Ben Kerner for $11,000 – an all-time high for an NBA rookie then. Pettit’s awkward ballhandling and a lack of strength to battle NBA bruisers weighing 200 pounds that early in his career, had Hawks coach Red Holzman move him from center, his position at LSU, to forward in his first training camp. “In college I played the standing pivot”, he said in a April 1957 issue of SPORT magazine interview. “My back was to the basket. In the pros, I’m always outside. Everything I do is facing the basket now. That was my chief difficulty in adjusting, the fact that I had never played forward before.” Though many were skeptical about Pettit making the transition from college to the rough-and-tumble NBA, in 1955 he won the NBA Rookie of the Year Award after averaging 20.4 points and 13.8 rebounds per game. He became the second rookie to win all-NBA honors but the team finished last in the Western Division. After the season, the Hawks moved to St. Louis.

He helped the Hawks improve during their first year in St. Louis by winning 33 games during 1955–56. In his second season, Pettit adjusted his game so that he would get to the free-throw line for easy points for his team and foul trouble for his opponents. Being a phenomenal offensive rebounder and an instinctive scorer, he told basketball historian Terry Pluto that “Offensive rebounds were worth eight to 12 points a night to me. Then I’d get another eight to 10 at the free-throw line. All I had to do was make a few jump shots and I was on my way to a good night.” Pettit won his first scoring title with a 25.7 average, and led the league in rebounding (1164 for a 16.2 average). He was also named MVP of the 1956 NBA All-Star Game after scoring 20 points with 24 rebounds and 7 assists; he would win subsequent MVP All-Star Game honors in 1958, 1959, and 1962. He also won his first of two NBA regular season MVP awards (the other was in 1959).In the 1960–61 season, Pettit averaged 27.9 points per game[5] and pulled down 20.3 rebounds

per game, making him one of only five players to ever break the 20 rpg barrier. He along with Wilt Chamberlain and Jerry Lucas are the only three people who averaged more than twenty points and twenty rebounds in an NBA season.

In the following season, he scored a career best 31.1 points per game, but the Hawks slipped to fourth place. After missing 30 games because of injuries, Pettit ended his career in 1965 still near the peak of his game. He was the first NBA player to eclipse the 20,000 points mark (20,880 for a 26.4 average). Of the 20,880 points he scored in the NBA, 6,182 of them (nearly 30 percent) came from free throws. His 12,849 rebounds were second most in league history at the time he retired, and his 16.2 rebounds per game career average remains third only to Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell.

Pettit was an NBA All-Star in each of his 11 seasons, was named to the All-NBA First Team ten times, and was named to the All-NBA Second Team once. Pettit still holds the top two NBA All-Star Game rebounding performances with 26 in 1958 and 27 in 1962, and has the second highest All-Star Game points per game average with 20.4 (behind only Oscar Robertson). Pettit averaged at least 20 points per game and at least 12 rebounds per game in each of his 11 NBA seasons.

He was the first recipient of the NBA’s Most Valuable Player Award. He also won the NBA All-Star Game MVP award four times, a feat matched only by Kobe Bryant.

In 1970, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Pettit was named to the NBA’s 35th Anniversary Team in 1980, and was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996.

Smallthoughts: Old School Tuesday spotlights…Bob Pettit.

Smallthoughts: Old School Tuesday …Dominique Wilkins


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Best known as The Human Highlight Film, Dominique Wilkins was a prolific scorer. His arsenal of dunks and moves oohed and ahed fans in the NBA. He played 11 seasons with the Atlanta Hawks and led the NBA in scoring with 30 points per game in the 1985-86 season. If you were to fast forward to today and think of a prolific scorer that matches Dominque Wilkins the name that comes to mind for me is Carmelo Anthony. Ironically, their career scoring average is exactly the same at 24.8 points per game.
Wilkins was instrumental in the Hawks’ prominence in the 1980s, when the club recorded four consecutive 50-win seasons during the decade. As Wilkins entered his thirties and the Hawks needed more of an all-around contribution from their star, Wilkins averaged 9.0 rebounds and 3.0 assists during the 1990–91 season.

A nine-time NBA All-Star and the winner of two NBA slam dunk contests, Wilkins registered 26,668 points and 7,169 rebounds in his NBA career. As of 2016, he ranks 15th on the NBA scoring list.
As a basketball player he was known as an acrobatic scorer, somewhat of a gunner, though an outstanding finisher and one of the greatest dunkers in NBA history.

His #21 jersey was retired by the Hawks on January 13, 2001. He is one of four players whose jerseys have been retired by the Hawks.
In case you are wondering who the 4 players to have their numbers retired in Hawks history …Bob Pettit #9 Dominique Wilkins #21 Lou Hudson #23 Pete Maravich #44 and Dikembe Mutombo #55.

Smallthoughts: Old School Tuesday spotlights…The Human Highlight Film …Dominique Wilkins.

Career history
19821994 Atlanta Hawks
1994 Los Angeles Clippers
1994–1995 Boston Celtics
1995–1996 Panathinaikos
1996–1997 San Antonio Spurs
1997–1998 Fortitudo Bologna
1999 Orlando Magic
Career highlights and awards
Career NBA statistics
Points 26,668 (24.8 ppg)
Rebounds 7,167 (6.7 rpg)
Assists 2,677 (2.5 apg

Smallthoughts: Rave of the Week …Adrian Beltre


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Adrian Beltre is overlooked and unappreciated and it has been this way for his whole career. For all the noise that Aaron Judge generates …Adrian Beltre quietly has put together quite a career. He has become the 31 st player in Major League history to reach 3,000 hits. Congratulations!

“What happened today after the hit, it was the best moment in my life,” Beltre said. “When I saw that, I felt like I was in the cloud because I really saw the joy in their faces. It was a nice moment to enjoy with them, my family, my wife.”

“We have a lot of great baseball players in the Dominican Republic, and I’m proud to be one of them,” Beltre said. He called the moment even more special because he was able to share it with his father on what was Father’s Day in the Dominican Republic.

Now in his 20th big league season, he is only the third player in the 3,000-hit club who is primarily a third baseman, joining Hall of Famers George Brett and Wade Boggs. All this came after a more bizarre episode on July 28th between Beltre’s Rangers and the visiting Marlins, that the veteran third baseman was taking his warm-up swings closer to home plate than where the on-deck circle was situated. When crew chief Gerry Davis told him to return to the designated location, Beltre simply picked up the on-deck circle and moved it to where he had been.

That was too much for Davis, who ejected Beltre and then, when Texas manager Jeff Banister came out to argue, tossed him as well. The eighth-inning incident provided one of the wackier moments of the season. Yet that was about as controversial as Beltre has been his career, when you talk about best hitters in the league seldom does his name come up yet he here is …Mr.3,000. Congratulations!